1. Sex Act in Sawdust

Sex Act in Sawdust

 

Tim Gregory's latest exhibition, Sawdust Sex, will be presented by Paper Mountain in Perth from July 27, but he needs some help.

 

An anonymous couple is needed to perform a sex act upon a layer of sawdust, leaving imprints to create the artwork. What is left behind will be shown to audience members who attend the exhibition between July 27 and August 11 at Paper Mountain Gallery.

 

Dr Tim Gregory, theorist and artist, is seeking an open-minded couple to voluntarily participate in this piece and can be contacted here.

 

His artistic focus has been upon spatial and sexual politics and his research examines the political potentiality of pornography to disturb the public's conservative interactions with image. His research has been published in international journals and he has completed artistic work for spaces including: the Museum of Contemporary Art, NSW Art Gallery and Latrobe Regional Gallery.

 

Gregory's work aims to engage audiences and to raise questioning about the way in which we categorise the newly visible. Sawdust Sex is his latest exploration of these ideas. It draws upon the idea of 'obscene'  by making reference to an 'offstage' occurrence that is not shown to the public. Viewers can use their own imaginations and perceptions to construct an image. The marks in the sawdust provide little clues for audience members and will entice them to use preconceived constructs of sexuality.

 

By creating a space of almost nothing, Sawdust Sex will allow us to see the image we could not usually think beyond.  

 

Tim was a Sydney-based artist who completed his Ph.D at the Centre for Contemporary Art and Politics when he was a researcher and was also a Postgraduate Research Development Officer for the National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA). He currently lectures in Theory for the School of Design and Art at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.

 

Paper Mountain is a small Artist-Run-Initiative (ARI) space running upstairs on Willams St, Northbridge  next to Little Willy's Café. Founded in 2011, Paper Mountain is one of Perth's newest ARIs and aims to promote emerging artists and provide studio spaces. One of the founders includes Amber Harries, who was selected for the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts' (PICA) Hatched Program in 2010.

Tim Gregory's latest exhibition, Sawdust Sex, will be presented by Paper Mountain in Perth from July 27, but he needs some help.

 

An anonymous couple is needed to perform a sex act upon a layer of sawdust, leaving imprints to create the artwork. What is left behind will be shown to audience members who attend the exhibition between July 27 and August 11 at Paper Mountain Gallery.

 

Dr Tim Gregory, theorist and artist, is seeking an open-minded couple to voluntarily participate in this piece and can be contacted here.

 

His artistic focus has been upon spatial and sexual politics and his research examines the political potentiality of pornography to disturb the public's conservative interactions with image. His research has been published in international journals and he has completed artistic work for spaces including: the Museum of Contemporary Art, NSW Art Gallery and Latrobe Regional Gallery.

 

Gregory's work aims to engage audiences and to raise questioning about the way in which we categorise the newly visible. Sawdust Sex is his latest exploration of these ideas. It draws upon the idea of 'obscene'  by making reference to an 'offstage' occurrence that is not shown to the public. Viewers can use their own imaginations and perceptions to construct an image. The marks in the sawdust provide little clues for audience members and will entice them to use preconceived constructs of sexuality.

 

By creating a space of almost nothing, Sawdust Sex will allow us to see the image we could not usually think beyond.  

 

Tim was a Sydney-based artist who completed his Ph.D at the Centre for Contemporary Art and Politics when he was a researcher and was also a Postgraduate Research Development Officer for the National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA). He currently lectures in Theory for the School of Design and Art at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia.

 

Paper Mountain is a small Artist-Run-Initiative (ARI) space running upstairs on Willams St, Northbridge  next to Little Willy's Café. Founded in 2011, Paper Mountain is one of Perth's newest ARIs and aims to promote emerging artists and provide studio spaces. One of the founders includes Amber Harries, who was selected for the Perth Institute of Contemporary Arts' (PICA) Hatched Program in 2010.


Posted on: Sunday 8th of September 2013


2. Something is paying the bills

Something is paying the bills

 

The Sun-Herald’s magazine insert Sunday Life a couple of weeks back ran an interview with a working girl that was completely matter-of-fact.  She is 40, with kids.. Her husband walked out on her after 15 years of marriage, and when she did her sums, she discovered that after the mortgage and the bills there would be no money for food, and placed an ad on a web-site giving her age, 40, the size of her tits, DD and offering “full service.”

She got a call straight away. She describes how nervous she was, how she fished out the appropriate lingerie from the back of a drawer, chose her clothes to show off her DD dimensions, showered, moisturised all over and drove to the hotel with her stomach churning.

He was a nice man, about 50, and though he paid for two hours she stayed for three. Sex took 45 minutes and the rest of the time was spent lying in bed and talking.

She sees up to four clients a day and makes between $800 and $1200.  It’s the perfect work and family balance, she says.

At no point in a full page article, of which “Melanie” herself appears to be the author, is there a moral judgement.

That’s not the case with the account by Sister Jane Frances de Chantal, who entered a Franciscan convent at 18 and left two years later, got married and moved from Britain to the US. It took until her 40s before she realised just how much her Catholic upbringing and her experience as a nun had damaged her sexual instincts.

Sister Jane is now Dr Fran Fisher, a sexologist. Her book comprises interviews with 28 women who also took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience, but then left orders. Some had had relationships with other nuns, some with priests, and some with lay people. One had intercourse for the first time at 52 and another at 50. She and her partner did it every night for two or three months. He thought she was an amazon. “I’ve waited 50 years for this, so just lie back and shut up,” she told him.

Fisher is fiercely critical of the Catholic system that allows naïve young women to uproot themselves from their families to enter a convent. It was wrong, and it is still going on, she says. There is a huge toll down the line, she says. The Church shouldn’t allow it to happen,


Posted on: Sunday 8th of September 2013


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